automotive

I went to a Cars and Coffee event at M1 Concourse and brought along my Morgan, a friend visiting from out of town, and my beloved Mamiya C220 TLR camera. I shot this picture late in the morning, stepping in front of the Unimog as the driver got in and started the machine, preparing to leave the show. Fortunately, he had the patience to wait for me to take the shot, rather than driving over me as would be extremely easy to do so in something with such massive ground clearance. I kind of like the unintentional lens flare in the shot. Picture shot with a Mamiya C220 and an 80mm f/2.8 lens with Kodak Portra 400.

Every year, the Henry Ford does an exhibit where they pop the hoods open of many of the cars in the museum exhibits. I brought along my TLR and shot some pictures of the most interesting engine bays on display. The Henry Ford has one of the six Bugatti Royales, and the hood is open to allow us plebs the opportunity to gaze upon the massive engine of one of the rarest cars in the world. Picture shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Fujifilm Provia 100.

I took my favorite medium format camera to Autorama and spent nearly four hours ogling the forms and colors of all of the hot rods and rat rods there on the show floor. I really liked the etched details in the headlight lens of the early V8 Ford hot rod, one of the Great 8 finalists, highlighted with LEDs around the perimeter of the headlamp. Also, with its shiny black paint, you can see its Oldsmobile hot rod neighbor, another Great 8 finalist, in the reflection. (And if you look closely, you can see me too.) Photo shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

I took my favorite medium format camera to Autorama and spent nearly four hours ogling the forms and colors of all of the hot rods and rat rods there on the show floor. I spotted this hood ornament sitting on the radiator shell of a Model A Ford, and I had to take a photo of it. The man who made the hood ornament also turned out to be the fellow who made most of the trophies for this year’s Autorama. Photo shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

I took my favorite medium format camera to Autorama and spent nearly four hours ogling the forms and colors of all of the hot rods and rat rods there on the show floor. While many cars there are primarily concerned with looking good, with speed taking secondary importance, this Mercedes 300 SL is primarily concerned with speed, it being a Bonneville Salt Flats car and all. So while looking good for this car was of secondary importance, it looks fantastic because… well, it’s a Gullwing. Photo shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

I was tasked with shooting the pictures for the trophies at a rallycross at Bundy Hill. On this day, the weather was warm and there was no snow cover, and as the day dragged on, the course became half big bumps and half deep ruts, wreaking havoc on the cars. I like this photo a lot because you can clearly see that the inside front wheel, after this car hit a big bump while turning into a sweeper, has no weight on it and consequently locked up while all the other wheels are still spinning. Photo taken with a Nikon D7200 and a 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.

I’m slowly working through the pictures I took at last Sunday’s rallycross at Bundy Hill. The course degenerated quickly until it was half bumps and half ruts, and absolutely pounded the cars. In the initial cull, this image stood out as one of the most awesome (in a literal sense) photos. That’s got to be almost 5 inches of air underneath the inside rear wheel; I’ve seen Evos tripod on concrete, but not on dirt, never mind to this degree on dirt. Given how bumpy the course was, and who was driving the car, perhaps it wouldn’t be a surprise that a picture like this could only come at the hands of this particular driver. Photo shot with a Nikon D7200 and a 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.

While the majority of the Midwest decided that the best course of action for a day that never even got close to cresting double digits was to stay inside, I did the stupid thing and joined a bunch of other foolish people to go rallycrossing in a snowy field in the middle of Michigan. I got pulled in to work as the trophy photographer, and spent much of my time on my feet out in the freezing cold trying to keep my camera battery and my digits from turning into icicles. How frequently do the words “Lexus RX300” and “motorsports” go together? Not often, probably. But here we are, with this shot of a Lexus RX300 killing a cone on the back section of the rallycross course. Photo shot with a Nikon D7200 and a 70-200mm f/4 lens.

I bought a Chinese TLR, a Huazhong that has the same basic body and build of the dime-a-dozen Seagull TLRs, but has a shutter that can fire up to 1/500 of a second. I shot a test roll in the camera at bitterly cold rallycross at Crystal Motor Speedway. I took this picture during my course walk, leaving the start line and up the hill into the bowl of the dirt track. The aperture is closed down, but the lens is focused close, producing this odd dreamy background effect that I’m not sure is due solely to physics or in part by the lens’ cheap terribleness. Picture shot on a Huazhong TLR camera with a 75mm/f3.5 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

I got free tickets to the Detroit Auto Show Industry Preview courtesy of a friend, and brought along some buddies to explore and photograph the auto show in relative calm. I liked the wheels on this BMW M3, and liked the muted colors in the frame, with the red display in the background and blue car and blue floor in the foreground. Picture shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR camera and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Fujifilm Provia 100.