I was asked to shoot the Ann Arbor Valentines Dance. I split my time between the white seamless photo studio downstairs and the dance floor upstairs. I’m not really all that great a portrait photographer; what I usually do is ask my subjects to do increasingly sillier things until everyone’s concentration breaks and we all laugh at ourselves. That’s one nice thing about shooting dancers — we’re all inherently silly and not serious anyway. After these two did a bunch of silly poses, they had a laugh and an embrace before leaving the set — all I did was keep shooting away. Funnily enough, I liked this picture more than any of the “posed” pictures they did earlier in this sequence. Photo shot with a Nikon D7200 and a 60mm f/2.8 lens, triggering a pair of Flashpoint R2 speedlights and a single Flashpoint Streaklight 360.

I was asked to shoot the Ann Arbor Valentines Dance. I split my time between the white seamless photo studio downstairs and the dance floor upstairs. Composition wise, this photo is a bit of a mess, having accidentally cut off limbs while trying to capture this photo. I certainly wasn’t expecting this dip, and judging by the expression on the follow’s face, neither was she. Not only that, it appears that the lead was surprised by the follow’s surprise, resulting in a cascade of hilarity that makes this one of my favorite social dance images of the night. Photo shot with a Nikon D7200 equipped with a Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 and a Nikon SB-900 speedlight.

Pictures at Mission Point Lighthouse

I traveled north to Traverse City to check out the Mission Point Lighthouse under night skies. I wasn’t racing that weekend, and it was a new moon, so I took […]

I took my favorite medium format camera to Autorama and spent nearly four hours ogling the forms and colors of all of the hot rods and rat rods there on the show floor. I really liked the etched details in the headlight lens of the early V8 Ford hot rod, one of the Great 8 finalists, highlighted with LEDs around the perimeter of the headlamp. Also, with its shiny black paint, you can see its Oldsmobile hot rod neighbor, another Great 8 finalist, in the reflection. (And if you look closely, you can see me too.) Photo shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

I took my favorite medium format camera to Autorama and spent nearly four hours ogling the forms and colors of all of the hot rods and rat rods there on the show floor. I spotted this hood ornament sitting on the radiator shell of a Model A Ford, and I had to take a photo of it. The man who made the hood ornament also turned out to be the fellow who made most of the trophies for this year’s Autorama. Photo shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

I took my favorite medium format camera to Autorama and spent nearly four hours ogling the forms and colors of all of the hot rods and rat rods there on the show floor. While many cars there are primarily concerned with looking good, with speed taking secondary importance, this Mercedes 300 SL is primarily concerned with speed, it being a Bonneville Salt Flats car and all. So while looking good for this car was of secondary importance, it looks fantastic because… well, it’s a Gullwing. Photo shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

Step 1: Leave home at 6:30pm, arrive in Grand Rapids at 9pm to pick up a friend.
Step 2: Head north to Traverse City, continue north until you reach the Mission Point Lighthouse on the lake shore at 11:30pm.
Step 3: Take pictures and stargaze in the cold for 1.5 hours.
Step 4: Depart for Grand Rapids at 1am in the morning. Drop off friend at 4:30am.
Step 5: Turn east towards home, arrive at home at 6:30am.

650 miles in 12 hours to go see stars. The trip wasn’t an absolute success; I had never been to Mission Point Lighthouse before, and didn’t know if it was too close to Traverse City — it was, and the light pollution, while low, was still noticeable — and if the lighthouse was dark — it wasn’t, as there was a street light right outside the lighthouse on the street that I wish was turned off — so I rolled the dice on shooting at a location that I hadn’t scouted out before and hoped for the best. Still, the clouds eventually cleared up and I spent about an hour looking for shots. Another pair of photographers showed up, and we bumbled around for a while talking gear, stars, and the fact that we both decided to arrive at this lighthouse at the exact same time to shoot stars. This was the nicest shot I took of the lighthouse under the night sky. Photo taken with a Nikon D7200 and a Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 lens, lighthouse was light painted with a video light.

I was tasked with shooting the pictures for the trophies at a rallycross at Bundy Hill. On this day, the weather was warm and there was no snow cover, and as the day dragged on, the course became half big bumps and half deep ruts, wreaking havoc on the cars. I like this photo a lot because you can clearly see that the inside front wheel, after this car hit a big bump while turning into a sweeper, has no weight on it and consequently locked up while all the other wheels are still spinning. Photo taken with a Nikon D7200 and a 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.

I’m slowly working through the pictures I took at last Sunday’s rallycross at Bundy Hill. The course degenerated quickly until it was half bumps and half ruts, and absolutely pounded the cars. In the initial cull, this image stood out as one of the most awesome (in a literal sense) photos. That’s got to be almost 5 inches of air underneath the inside rear wheel; I’ve seen Evos tripod on concrete, but not on dirt, never mind to this degree on dirt. Given how bumpy the course was, and who was driving the car, perhaps it wouldn’t be a surprise that a picture like this could only come at the hands of this particular driver. Photo shot with a Nikon D7200 and a 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.