Photos

I bought a rare Bronica 135w panoramic film back from eBay, and once it arrived, I loaded it with Kodak Portra 400 and went shooting a test roll at the Henry Ford. I didn’t have a focusing screen marked for the panoramic image area, so I eyeballed things and took a rough guess as to how the framing would turn out. I took a wide shot of this group of visitors being briefed by a tour guide on the history of the presidential limousines parked along the edge of the museum. Photo shot with a Bronica ETR 645 film camera and a 50mm f/2.8 lens with a 135w panoramic film back loaded with Kodak Portra 400.

I got free tickets to the Detroit Auto Show Industry Preview courtesy of a friend, and brought along some buddies to explore and photograph the auto show in relative calm. I had to laugh when I spotted this scene: a dude in an orange jacket taking a picture of a bright orange Camaro. Photo was taken with a Nikon FM3a and a 50mm f/1.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

I bought a rare Bronica 135w panoramic film back from eBay, and once it arrived, I loaded it with Kodak Portra 400 and went to the Henry Ford to shoot a test roll. I didn’t have a focusing screen marked for the panoramic frame, so I eyeballed things and took a rough guess as to how the framing would turn out. As it so happened, I wasn’t quite perfect on the framing here, as I didn’t have the headroom I thought I did above the GT written on the rear wing of the modern Ford GT LeMans car. Still, I like this image quite a lot. Photo shot with a Bronica ETR 645 film camera and a 50mm f/2.8 lens with a 135w panoramic film back loaded with Kodak Portra 400.

I got free tickets to the Detroit Auto Show Industry Preview courtesy of a friend, and brought along some buddies to explore and photograph the auto show in relative calm. I liked how the Ford GT looked with the crowd silhouetted against the turntable’s spotlights. Also, that dude in the back has a very appropriate jacket. Picture shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR camera and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Fujifilm Provia 100.

I got free tickets to the Detroit Auto Show Industry Preview courtesy of a friend, and brought along some buddies to explore and photograph the auto show in relative calm. The big news in the Ford booth was the public unveiling of not only the new Bullitt Mustang, but the original one as well. Very few people paid attention to the new Mustang, with almost all eyes on the one and only original. I didn’t buck the trend myself. Picture shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR camera and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Fujifilm Provia 100.

The group of friends with whom I used to do “Top Gear and Tacos” (back when the British Top Gear was still chugging along with Jeremy, Hammond, and May) most every Tuesday of every week did something called the 80’s Turbo Challenge one year. The next year, we attempted to do the same, but due to lack of planning, it turned into more of a “Top Gear and Tacos Goes Camping by a Neat Lake, Not Quite the 80’s Turbo Challenge.” Since we were in northern Michigan, I took a camera and a tripod and did some shooting in the woods near the campground. This watch tower, no longer used for watching for forest fires but still standing, sits against a Milky Way backdrop. Photo shot with a Nikon D7200 and a Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 lens.

For a few years, I shot white seamless portraits at Ann Arbor’s Pirate Swing. I dragged a bunch of white reflective boards to the Saturday night venue, laid them all out on the floor, set up a white background and three studio strobes, and invited the costumed dancers to cheese it up for me in front of the camera. This is one of my favorite images, if nothing more for the sheer contrast. Photo shot with a Nikon D700 and a 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6, with Pocket Wizards triggering three Alien Bees B800 strobes.

I shot this picture back when Detroit Region SCCA still ran autocross events at the Pontiac Silverdome. I went around the grid and tried my hand at taking people portraits. This was one of my favorites: two young novices getting ready to make a run. Smiles were captured using my favorite technique — aim the camera, start firing away, move my head away from the camera while still firing the shutter, and giving the subjects a glare or an evil grin, thereby usually getting rid of the deer-in-the-headlights stare and getting a laugh, which then becomes the photograph I keep. Photo shot with a Nikon D700 and a 24-70mm f/2.8 lens.

I’m… not quite sure what is going on here. This was the band for Pirate Swing, the members whom decided that they wanted a white seamless portrait of themselves. I’m sure there’s some sort of meaning here that is too deep for me to understand, so don’t ask me why one person is holding a roll of gaffer tape and another is hoisting a jar of spaghetti sauce in the air like it’s the Stanley Cup. Photo shot with a Nikon D700 and a 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.

Some dance photographers are passive observers. Then you have photographers like me, who… aren’t. It’s no secret that I get up close to the dancers I photograph, and occasionally encourage/goad/cheer on fellow dancers. This is one my favorite dance photos. Notice that everyone else is standing around. Why? Because the song ended 10 seconds ago. I spotted this dip, trained my camera on the pair, and simply kept shooting and shooting. Without moving the camera, I moved my head away from the viewfinder and gave the lead an evil grin as he struggled to keep the dip going, eventually nearly dropping his follow on the floor. The laughs I got from the lead and the follow are what make this image for me. Photo shot on a Nikon D700 with 24-70mm f/2.8 lens.