May 2018

I took my favorite medium format camera to Autorama and spent nearly four hours ogling the forms and colors of all of the hot rods and rat rods there on the show floor. The Waterford Hills Racing folks brought out a bunch of cars for their yearly Autorama booth, and this Big Healey was my favorite car of the bunch. Photo shot with a Mamiya C220 TLR and an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

I took my Rolleiflex Old Standard, a twin lens reflex medium format film camera from 1930s Germany (and the oldest camera I have in my collection) out to a rallycross at Bundy Hill and shot my very first roll of film through it. There’s some sort of light leak that I need to chase down. Regardless, I like this picture of cones and cars trailing off into the distance. Matt and Dan discuss rallycross event chair stuff while Milo, the husky, surveys his wintry domain. Photo shot with a Rolleiflex Old Standard on Fujifilm Acros 100 film.

I am a Patreon of this website called Casual Photophile. It’s a beautifully done website with reviews of interesting old film cameras, discussions about the old photography masters, and an occasional foray into the world of mirrorless cameras. It’s like the Petrolicious of film cameras.

As a diehard film shooter and mildly annoying film shooting evangelist, I’m a top tier supporter at $25 a month. There are two perks on top of supporting one of my favorite websites on the web. Every month, I get sent a roll of film sent to my mailbox — a roll of film that I usually don’t end up shooting, as I’ve got so much film that I’ve purchased and want to shoot instead. So the film perk ends up something I don’t particularly care about.

But every year, I get sent a cheap little camera to play with. And I got my first rewards camera, which is this Zeiss Ikon Contina viewfinder camera.

It’s a very basic camera. Focus is via scale focusing, as it being a viewfinder camera means that there are no provisions for a rangefinder. Top shutter speed is 1/300 of a second, so not a particularly fast shutter. But it has a red dot on the focus scale, and f/8 is marked in red on the aperture ring. Set the camera to f/8 and the focus ring to the red dot, and everything from infinity down to 3 meters is in focus!

Not only does the camera work, with nothing to suggest any show stoppers in use, the camera is also beautiful. There are very few scuffs, the glass is clean and clear, and the viewfinder isn’t fogged up. The leatherette is also in amazingly good condition, though it does have that “old camera smell” to it.

So between the Kodak Retina and this Zeiss Contina, I have two German cameras in the collection. I’m waiting for an opportunity to take both cameras out and shoot a test roll in each…

I took my Rolleiflex Old Standard, a twin lens reflex medium format film camera from 1930s Germany (and the oldest camera I have in my collection) out to a rallycross at Bundy Hill and shot my very first roll of film through it. I don’t know why the film didn’t advance to the last frame — at least, I think I advanced it to frame 12 — but the resulting double exposure, the first exposure being that of a friend, and the second exposure being that of a trio of competitors enjoying post-rallycross beers, looks kinda cool. I’ve never really played around with double exposures before; maybe I should? Photo shot with a Rolleiflex Old Standard on Fujifilm Acros 100 film.

Is there anything more classic than a MG TC Midget? I don’t think so. This beautiful example bears the proud badges of past events and club memberships, and the windshield is in the correct position — down. Photo shot with a Mamiya C220 with an 80mm f/2.8 lens on Kodak Portra 400.

At the last Cars and Coffee type gathering at the Walter P. Chrysler Museum right before it permanently closed, I swung by with a Bronica in my bag and wandered the lot taking some pictures. Then I put the camera on a shelf and forgot about that roll of film for over a year. When I finally developed the film, the colors had shifted as a result of heat and time. I like the look — I think it looks appropriately aged, as if I had shot the frame decades ago. In the frame, we have a modern day GTI sitting next to an old Big Healey. Photo taken with a Bronica 645 ETR on what I think was Kodak Ektar 100 film.